Bills to follow during the 2015 Alabama Legislative Session

The 2015 Alabama Legislative Session kicks off it’s marathon session tomorrow in Montgomery. Tackling issues such as charter schools to consumer debt, Alabama legislators will have plenty to deal with.

Here are a few issues to keep an eye on as session prepares to start.

LIQUID


Death by electric chair – Sounds harsh, doesn’t it? Not so much according to this bill. SB11 would bring back use of the state’s dormant electric chair. Under current state law, if one is sentenced to the death penalty, they may choose between lethal injection or the electric chair.

According to AL.com, an inmate sentenced to death row hasn’t been executed since 2013 because the state does not have the drugs available.

SB11 would alter that provision. Inmates may still choose their way of death, but if lethal injection is unavailable, the state would put them to death with the electric chair.

Priorities for Republicans, I guess.

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The Congressional Millionaires Club

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Photo courtesy of lovemmclub.com

Political season has officially arrived. That cold weather that dipped into Florida earlier this week that forced you to cover your plants with those old colored fitted sheets, that brisk puff of cold air was actually the emptied souls left behind from political seasons past.

It had nothing to do with the so-called “polar vortex,” so don’t believe the weatherman.

Tis the season to go knocking, right? When those politicians, and want-to-be politicians, come knocking at your door asking for your vote, and they tell you that D.C. is broken, tell them to kick rocks.

According to a new report issued by the Center for Responsive Politics, just about half of all members of Congress are millionaires. Those same lawmakers who claim to represent the least of the; those same men and women who either want less government for the good of the country or a little more for the good of the country are delivering that message from an ivory tower.

Take the sometimes pompous chair of the House Oversight Committee Darrell Issa. He recently said that the testimony that Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius gave to the committee was false. That has little to do with his ability to connect with voters and more to do with his disdain for the Affordable Care Act, but I digress.

Superficially, wouldn’t Issa’s words sound better if his political affiliation was different and he wasn’t reportedly worth almost $600 million?

For any member of Congress, that’s a lot of dough. Doesn’t take away from Issa’s ability to govern or look after his constituents, just shows that there may be a disconnect.

“Washington D.C. is broken” is the narrative that we’ve heard for a long time now. President Barack Obama was swept into office promising to change the culture in D.C. because the politicians there were so out-of-touch.

So what does this financial report prove?

I’ll give you a hint. Last year, Speaker of the House John Boehner said that “when you raise the price of employment, guess what happens? You get less of it.”

Translation is that he and the majority of his Republican colleagues do not support an increase.

Now I understand that the argument against or for an increase in the minimum wage isn’t simple, but hearing that those who oppose it make at least $900,000 a year is a little sickening.

This all just means that the gap between the haves and the have nots has turned into a gulf.

Oh, and one of the richest members of Congress resides in Florida. Vernon Buchanan is a Republican who represents Florida’s 16th is potentially worth a cool $235 million.

Good luck finding him at the local Winn-Dixie picking through the good grapes.

-JH

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What You Need to Know About the Budget Deal

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Photo courtesy of http://www.upi.com

President Obama will have a shiny new budget deal to sign when he sits at his desk on Thursday morning as the United States Senate approved a two-year budget deal late Wednesday night.

The deal was approved by the House last week and is considered bi-partisan as it was supported by Democrats and Republicans.

That’s all well and good, but for most Americans interested in this story, what does it do for them?

Here are the main takeaways from Wednesday’s budget deal.

-“Domestic agencies” will receive a $22 billion increase in funding.

-Though sequestration remains alive with the new budget deal, the hit of the across-the-board spending cuts will be eased as the deal includes a $63 billion sequestration provision.

-Additionally, sequestration will graduate into 2023 in an effort to reduce the deficit.

-Spending for the Pentagon in 2014 will be $1.01 trillion.

-$6 billion in reduced payments to student-loan debt collectors.

-A $12 billion reduction in contributions to federal pensions.

-Airline security fees for passengers will increase by $12.6 billion.

A full budget summary is available via The Washington Post but some of the more important aspects of the deal are listed above.

-JH

Check out the latest Jason Henry Project for news and commentary on Florida and national politics, international affairs, sports, and more!

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